Sunshine Coast Centre RASC

Meeting for Friday, February 8 Cancelled due to Snow

Sechelt, British Columbia, 2019 February 8: 1300 hours

Due to the snow and adverse conditions, the monthly meeting of the Sunshine Coast Centre of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada on Friday, 2019 February 8, at 7:30 PM at the Sunshine Coast Art Centre, 5714 Medusa St., Sechelt, is cancelled. The speaker on March 8 will be Eric Lanoix, SpaceX engineer, who will be talking about the Dragon capsule.

Sunshine Coast RASC Past President Charles Ennis

 

 

Flaming star Nebula (IC405)

The Flaming Star Nebula is an emission and reflection nebula in the constellation Auriga, part of a molecular cloud illuminated by the “runaway” star AE Aurigae. This bright star is a transient visitor to this region, ejected from the Orion Nebula by the collision of two binary star groups. Ultraviolet radiation from the star ionizes and excites hydrogen gas glows to glow red. A smaller region closer to the star shines blue, due to the dust reflecting the starlight. (nebula description from “The 100 Best Astrophotography Targets”)

Image taken on Feb.5th from Roberts Creek, with a 120mm Megrez and a DSLR camera. Sky conditions were q good with an SQM of 20 but humidity was high at >75%.

Total Lunar Eclipse: 2019 January 20

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Eclipse from 2015: photo by Brian Kelso

We will be opening our SCC Observatory at 18:30 hours on the evening of 20/21 January 2019, to view the total lunar eclipse. This eclipse will be visible in all of North America. The weather forecast is favourable: We’ll update this post in the afternoon on the 20th.

UPDATE, 20 January, 3 PM: Skies looking good! Observatory will be open at 6:30 PM.

ECLIPSE TIMING FOR SECHELT:

Starts 6:36 pm PST

Partial Starts 7:33 pm PST

Total Starts 8:41 pm PST

Maximum 9:12 pm PST

Total Ends 9:43 pm PST

Partial Ends 10:50 pm PST

Ends 11:48 pm PST

The RASC’s Youth Coordinator Jenna Hinds has produced a YouTube video with a few simple demos and explanations of lunar eclipses: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eyvMuWFelf4

Clear skies!

Charles Ennis, Past President

 

Our Christmas Comet

Finally the clouds were gone and we were able to view the comet 46P Wirtanen last night. Club members viewed it from the observatory and I took the opportunity to photograph it from home.

46P/Wirtanen is a small short-period comet with a current orbital period of 5.4 years. It is currently about 12 million kms from earth. I wasn’t able to see the comet by eye but was easy to see in binoculars or the scope of course.

The image here was taken with a Canon 60Da on a 120 mm Megrez refractor, it is a stack of 3 sets of 5 frames at 30,60 and 90 seconds with flats and dark flats applied. Mike

Speaker for 11 January: Paul Gray

paul grayAt 7:30 PM, 11 January 2019, at the Sunshine Coast Art Centre, 5714 Medusa St., Sechelt, the Sunshine Coast Centre of the RASC presents Paul Gray, the editor of the RASC Calendar, who will be doing a presentation on Dark Nebulae. A dark nebula or absorption nebula is an interstellar cloud so dense that it obscures the light from objects behind it, such as background stars and emission or reflection nebulae. Interstellar dust grains, coasted with frozen carbon monoxide and nitrogen, in in the coldest, densest parts of larger clouds effectively block the passage of light at visible wavelengths. These clouds are the spawning grounds of stars and planets, and understanding their development is essential to understanding star formation.

The largest dark nebulae, like the Coalsack Nebula and the Great Rift, are visible to the naked eye, appearing as dark patches against the brighter background of the Milky Way.

Admission is free: donations gratefully accepted at the door.

More Members Complete Qualified Operator Training

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Shannon using the observatory telescope.

Last night (Saturday, 1 December), We conducted a training session at the observatory and Shannon McLaughlin completed her training as Qualified Operator. Ed Hanlon came later and went through some of the training, but we were losing the sky by that time, so he’ll come back and complete the QO course later.

If you’re interested in learning how to use the observatory telescope, please contact me. We’ll take you through the procedure of opening/closing the observatory, starting up and parking the telescope, navigating the night skies with the telescope, and recovering from telescope failures to get back into action quickly.

Charles Ennis, Past President

2 Records Broken at the Observatory Last Night

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Bruce Woodburn taking a break from binocular observations to view M13 last night with the big scope.

At last night’s public viewing session at our observatory we broke two records. One concerned yearly attendance, which stood at 311 just two days ago. Last year’s total attendance was only 159, so we knew to double that we needed just 7 more people to attend this year. Attendance last night was 29, which is the highest attendance ever recorded at a public session. So we easily pushed past doubling last year’s attendance to a new record of 340. And the year isn’t done yet! We had people of all ages at the observatory last night. One little girl told us her favorite planet was Saturn, and was ecstatic when she saw it for the first time in the eyepiece. Several members worked on their observing certificates. James MacWilliam showed up with his guitar and entertained us for hours. A thoroughly entertaining evening.

Charles Ennis

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