Sunshine Coast Centre RASC

Home » Posts tagged 'astrophotography'

Tag Archives: astrophotography

Speaker for April 12: Alan Dyer

apr 2019 dyer modified

At 7:30 PM, 2019 April 12, at the Sunshine Coast Art Centre, 5714 Medusa St., Sechelt, the Sunshine Coast Centre of the RASC presents the renowned astrophotographer Alan Dyer, whose topic will be “Chasing the Northern Lights”. Alan will recount his tales of chasing the aurora in Canada and Norway, with many images and movies of the Northern Lights, including of the infamous “Steve” aurora.

Alan Dyer is co-author with Terence Dickinson of The Backyard Astronomer’s Guide, and most recently of ebooks on astrophotography. He is a contributing editor to SkyNews and Sky & Telescope magazines, and a contributor to the annual RASC Observer’s Handbook. His photos and videos have appeared on Spaceweather.com, National Geographic, CBSNews, and more. The asteroid #78434 is named in his honour.

Admission is free: donations gratefully accepted at the door.

Heavenly Wonders at GPAG

ngc 7023

NGC 7023

From July 12 to August 12 the Gibsons Public Art Gallery will be presenting a collection of photos, Heavenly Wonders- Astrophotography by Erwin Diener. We invite you to be moved and challenged by the profound beauty and vastness of cosmic space while reflecting on the human experience. This meet and greet event is scheduled for Saturday July 21, 1 pm – 4 pm. Members of the Sunshine Coast Centre will be present to interpret the photos and show the public views of the sky with telescopes.

GPAG_logo_white_300ppi (4)

Astrophotography Course: 13 January

At 7:30 PM on Friday, 13 January, our Vice President, Mike Bradley, will be teaching a course on Astrophotography at the Sunshine Coast Arts Centre, 5714 Medusa St, Sechelt. Public is welcome: admission by donation

IMG_2443

Mike on the set of Coyote Science last Spring

Solar Prominences

Attached is another  image I took yesterday, it shows a nice wispy prominence extending two or three earth diameters above the “surface”. Like the image earlier today this was taken in monochrome with a H alpha scope and then coloured as a last step.

 

MikeSun_Gain=1782_ColPasteCrop3

Solar Filaments

Sun_Gain=257_ColShEven though the sun cycle approaches solar minimum, there is still plenty to look and wonder at.

I took the attached image yesterday, it shows a huge solar filament meandering across the solar disc. I estimate that this must be 700,000 km or so in length. Solar filaments are regions of dense, cool gas held in place by magnetic fields, this one has been visible for several days now.

 

Mike

Messier 5

This image of Messier 5 was imaged from Roberts Creek on June 28/29, 2016 with a Megrez 120mm, Canon 60Da, and a x1.6 Barlow lens. Guided exposures were taken at 10, 30, 60 and 120 seconds for a total exposure time of 30 mins. at 1600 ISO. Stacking was with Deep Sky Stacker, processing in Photoshop CS2 and PixInsight. The sky quality was good the moon had not risen, unfortunately I forgot to take an SQM reading.
Globular Cluster M5 is 24,500-light years away in the constellation Serpens. At about 13 billion, it is one of the most ancient globular clusters known, having formed only a few billion years after the Big Bang. M5 is one of the 160 globular clusters known to reside in a spherical halo around the Milky Way’s galactic center. M5 is one of the larger globular clusters, containing about 100,000 stars within a diameter of 165 light-years.
M5 is located in the constellation Serpens Caput, just north of Zubeneschamali. It is barely detectable to the unaided eye as a faint star but in binoculars, it appears as a faint, fuzzy star. The image here was taken through a 120mm Megrez refractor. Some amateur observers think that M5 is the finest globular cluster north of the celestial equator for small telescopes – even better than the celebrated M13, the Great Hercules cluster.

Mike BradleyMessier5_2

Planet Viewing Star Party

photo 2

Mike Bradley and Deborah McWilliams checking out the image of Mars on the laptop as Mike takes photos for processing

Last night (4 June) 24 people of all ages attended our club’s “Last Call for Jupiter” Star Party for members at the SCC Observatory. It was a beautiful night, with just a trace of high cloud. There were 10 telescopes set up including the observatory’s 14 inch Celestron Edge HD. Later in the session our VP, Mike Bradley, hooked up his camera to the observatory’s telescope to capture images of the planets.

photo 4

People of all ages watch Mike take photos of Saturn

Jupiter, Mars, and Saturn were all prominent in the sky, with Mars making a close approach to Earth and Saturn at opposition.

We look forward to seeing the results of the photography session.

Charles Ennis, President