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Speaker for April 12: Alan Dyer

apr 2019 dyer modified

At 7:30 PM, 2019 April 12, at the Sunshine Coast Art Centre, 5714 Medusa St., Sechelt, the Sunshine Coast Centre of the RASC presents the renowned astrophotographer Alan Dyer, whose topic will be “Chasing the Northern Lights”. Alan will recount his tales of chasing the aurora in Canada and Norway, with many images and movies of the Northern Lights, including of the infamous “Steve” aurora.

Alan Dyer is co-author with Terence Dickinson of The Backyard Astronomer’s Guide, and most recently of ebooks on astrophotography. He is a contributing editor to SkyNews and Sky & Telescope magazines, and a contributor to the annual RASC Observer’s Handbook. His photos and videos have appeared on Spaceweather.com, National Geographic, CBSNews, and more. The asteroid #78434 is named in his honour.

Admission is free: donations gratefully accepted at the door.

Flaming star Nebula (IC405)

The Flaming Star Nebula is an emission and reflection nebula in the constellation Auriga, part of a molecular cloud illuminated by the “runaway” star AE Aurigae. This bright star is a transient visitor to this region, ejected from the Orion Nebula by the collision of two binary star groups. Ultraviolet radiation from the star ionizes and excites hydrogen gas glows to glow red. A smaller region closer to the star shines blue, due to the dust reflecting the starlight. (nebula description from “The 100 Best Astrophotography Targets”)

Image taken on Feb.5th from Roberts Creek, with a 120mm Megrez and a DSLR camera. Sky conditions were q good with an SQM of 20 but humidity was high at >75%.

Our Christmas Comet

Finally the clouds were gone and we were able to view the comet 46P Wirtanen last night. Club members viewed it from the observatory and I took the opportunity to photograph it from home.

46P/Wirtanen is a small short-period comet with a current orbital period of 5.4 years. It is currently about 12 million kms from earth. I wasn’t able to see the comet by eye but was easy to see in binoculars or the scope of course.

The image here was taken with a Canon 60Da on a 120 mm Megrez refractor, it is a stack of 3 sets of 5 frames at 30,60 and 90 seconds with flats and dark flats applied. Mike

Crescent Nebula

The Crescent Nebula (NGC 6888) is a cosmic bubble about 25 light-years across in the constellation Cygnus, blown by winds from its central, bright, massive star. The nebula’s central star is classified as a Wolf-Rayet star (WR 136). The star is shedding its outer envelope in a strong stellar wind, ejecting the equivalent of the Sun’s mass every 10,000 years. The nebula is 5000 light years from us.

I captured the image last weekend with a Megrez 120mm, Canon 60Da camera, unfortunately exposure was limited to 120 minutes in all, the image was processed in PixInsight. Mike

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Open Night at Observatory Cancelled

Due to a shortage of instructors we have had to cancel the public night at the SCAC Observatory for October 13th.
Please accept our apologies for this.

September 14th Meeting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our speaker on 7 September will be Richard Shaw from the
Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory in the Okanagan
who will be talking about the new CHIME telescope.

Join us for what will be a fascinating talk

Our sun is still an interesting place to view!

I took this image through the clubs new Quark Hydrogen Alpha (Ha) eyepiece last Friday mid afternoon (14/7/18), seeing was quite good. The combination of camera/eyepiece/telescope results in a small field of view, but one where the details of the solar chromosphere are revealed very nicely. The image was taken in monochrome and coloured to match the Ha colour..We are looking at an area where bundles of magnetic fields lines are concentrated.

We will have the eyepiece, and other solar viewing equipment in use at the Gibsons Art Gallery next Saturday for our meet and greet with Erwin. Come by and take a look at his images and the sun!