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Monthly Archives: July 2016

Deep Sky Party 3

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Danny, our ambassador for the visitors this weekend

Members and visitors viewed the skies for the second night in a row last night. It was not as clear a sky as Friday night, with clouds drifting through, but we did get some viewing between the clouds.

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Everyone getting set up at sunset

Solar Prominences

Attached is another  image I took yesterday, it shows a nice wispy prominence extending two or three earth diameters above the “surface”. Like the image earlier today this was taken in monochrome with a H alpha scope and then coloured as a last step.

 

MikeSun_Gain=1782_ColPasteCrop3

Deep Sky Part Two

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Members from other RASC Centres setting up for last night’s star party

Tonight is the second night of the clubs star party at our airport site at the top of field rd…

Last nights conditions were exceptional… at least the clarity of the sky was. While it was not so good for viewing planets because of the turbulence in the air the transparency was excellent. The milky way was etched sharply against a black background of stars and was
clearly visible from the north east horizon down to the southern horizon. The club scope was up and running as well as numerous other scopes from members and guests. Among the numerous star clusters and galaxies we viewed we were also treated to 2 passes of the space station and numerous bright meteors from 2 currently active meteor showers.

We also have several guests from the Victoria centre staying on site and possibly some today from Vancouver… feel free to drop by the site to say hello and welcome them to our beautiful area.

If all goes well, weather wise, tonight should be spectacular!!!!

the gate is closed now but unlocked so members can still access the site…pls leave gate as you find it when you enter.

Members and guests are welcome…

I hope to see you there!

neil sandy
rasc member

Solar Filaments

Sun_Gain=257_ColShEven though the sun cycle approaches solar minimum, there is still plenty to look and wonder at.

I took the attached image yesterday, it shows a huge solar filament meandering across the solar disc. I estimate that this must be 700,000 km or so in length. Solar filaments are regions of dense, cool gas held in place by magnetic fields, this one has been visible for several days now.

 

Mike

Deep Sky Party Commences!

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People attending our grand opening of the observatory in June 2015

Tonight and for the next two nights astronomers from the Vancouver and Victoria Centres of the RASC will join us at the SCC Observatory to view the skies. Some will be camping there, others will be staying with RASC members. I hope that all of our members will join us at the observatory with their telescopes to view the skies this weekend. The forecast is for clear skies. Danny will be camping at the observatory this weekend as our “ambassador”. Members are welcome to bring family and guests. Please review the protocols for observatory use on our Observatory page.

Messier 5

This image of Messier 5 was imaged from Roberts Creek on June 28/29, 2016 with a Megrez 120mm, Canon 60Da, and a x1.6 Barlow lens. Guided exposures were taken at 10, 30, 60 and 120 seconds for a total exposure time of 30 mins. at 1600 ISO. Stacking was with Deep Sky Stacker, processing in Photoshop CS2 and PixInsight. The sky quality was good the moon had not risen, unfortunately I forgot to take an SQM reading.
Globular Cluster M5 is 24,500-light years away in the constellation Serpens. At about 13 billion, it is one of the most ancient globular clusters known, having formed only a few billion years after the Big Bang. M5 is one of the 160 globular clusters known to reside in a spherical halo around the Milky Way’s galactic center. M5 is one of the larger globular clusters, containing about 100,000 stars within a diameter of 165 light-years.
M5 is located in the constellation Serpens Caput, just north of Zubeneschamali. It is barely detectable to the unaided eye as a faint star but in binoculars, it appears as a faint, fuzzy star. The image here was taken through a 120mm Megrez refractor. Some amateur observers think that M5 is the finest globular cluster north of the celestial equator for small telescopes – even better than the celebrated M13, the Great Hercules cluster.

Mike BradleyMessier5_2

Sea Cavalcade 2016 Update

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Mike shows solar prominences to visitors at the solar scopes while Scott mans the booth at Sea Cavalcade 2016

Yesterday we tallied 510 visitors to our booth and the solar scopes at Sea Cavalcade 2016. Scott, Mike, Sam Casoria, Charles, and David worked the booth and telescopes. Guest appearances included Errol Lipschitz, James MacWilliam, and Neil Sandy.

The list of giveaway items distributed is as follows;

Moon Gazer’s Guide : 73

Star Finders : 116

Getting Started in Astronomy guide : 17

Journal of the RASC edition on light abatement : 16

-Scott Harlow